Foster

Voting Record

Voting Record

Source: TheyWorkForYou.com

Industry

Foster voted against investment aimed at growing a productive economy focused on science, technology and green jobs.

Foster voted against plans to save the steel industry; including fast-tracking infrastructure projects that require large amounts of steel.

War

Foster voted in favour of proposed spending cuts and changes to the welfare system and in favour of spending £200 billion on new nuclear weapons, during austerity, taking money away from social projects.

Foster voted against an investigation into the contrast between public statements and private actions in the run up to the Iraq war.

Foster voted against contributing to the resolution of the refugee crisis in Europe, caused by the military action.


EU

Foster voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.

Foster voted against calling for the Government to outline a positive vision for the UK's continued membership of the EU; thereby allowing the negativity to exist.

Foster voted against a permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU.

Foster voted to leave the EU on the 12th of April 2019 without a withdrawal agreement (That is, he voted to "crash out").

Foster voted to revoke arrangements for cross-border action to tackle infringements of various EU consumer laws.

Foster voted to make EU, EEA, and Swiss nationals, and their family members, subject to UK immigration controls. He voted against guaranteeing EU derived rights, and the potential to acquire residency rights, for EU and EEA citizens legally resident in the UK.

Foster voted to amend the law on accounts and reports from corporate bodies to remove the involvement of the EU.

Foster voted against making retaining membership of the European medicines regulatory network a government objective.

Foster voted against making the UK's withdrawal from the EU conditional on seeking, as an objective for the UK's negotiation of the withdrawal agreement, an international agreement which enables the United Kingdom to continue to participate in the European Economic Area.

Foster voted to allow laws which were required by the UK's membership of the European single market to be weakened, removed or replaced by Ministers after the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

A proposal to ensure that the rights of workers and employees in the UK are no less favourable than those in EU, was voted against by Foster.

Foster voted against the European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights remaining part of UK law on the UK's withdrawal from the European Union.

Foster voted to give ministers (not parliament) the power to correct "deficiencies" in retained EU law.

Kevin Foster voted against the UK remaining a member of the European Atomic Agency Community (Euratom) and against treating leaving Euratom separately from leaving the EU; even though Euratom is a community organization that is independent from the EU. The Euratom Treaty represents pioneering legislation concerning binding transfrontier obligations with respect to environmental impact and protection of humans. Foster wants out.

Foster voted against the UK opting into a proposed EU directive on combating terrorism.

Social Support

Foster consistently voted for a reduction in spending on welfare support.

Foster voted against local councils having the freedom to decide if benefits to cover housing costs should be reduced in respect of excess bedrooms in cases of new local council secure tenancies offered to victims of domestic abuse.

Foster voted for reductions in support for disabled and ill claimants required to participate in activities intended to increase their chances of obtaining work.

Foster voted to remove the "limited capability for work" element of Universal Credit.

Foster voted to remove the "work-related activity component" from the Employment and Support Allowance.

Foster voted to reduce the household benefit cap, to freeze the rate of many working-age benefits.

Foster voted against analysing how changes impact those in different income groups.

Foster voted for cuts to tax credits.

Put simply, Foster voted in favour of proposed spending cuts and changes to the welfare system and in favour of spending on new nuclear weapons.

Climate Emergency

Consistently voted against measures to prevent climate change.

Foster voted to stop wind and water turbines benefiting from a special reduced rate of VAT that apply to the supply and installation of energy-saving materials in residential accommodation.

Foster voted not to reduce the permitted carbon dioxide emission rate of new homes.

Foster voted against requiring a strategy for carbon capture and storage for the energy industry.

Foster voted against setting a decarbonisation target for the UK within six months of June 2016 and to review it annually thereafter.

Foster voted against charging a tax based on carbon dioxide emissions on vehicles costing over £40,000.

Foster voted to apply the Climate Change Levy tax to electricity generated from renewable sources.

Foster voted against financial incentives for low carbon emission electricity generation methods.

If former coal power stations are running wholly or partially on biomass (such as wood or other plant material), Foster voted against providing them support.

Foster voted against steps designed to ensure that Brexit does not result in the removal or lowering of any rights, obligations, restrictions that contribute to the protection and improvement of the environment.

Banks

Foster voted against higher taxes on banks.

Foster voted in favour of excluding overseas activities of UK banking groups from the bank levy.

Workers Rights

Foster consistently voted for more restrictive regulation of trade union activity.

Foster voted to make industrial action more difficult for school teachers, transport workers, railway staff, airport security staff, air traffic control staff, London bus staff, health workers, border security workers, fire service workers, and ambulance workers.

In the Trade Union Bill, Foster voted against allowing workplace ballots, to be held wholly, or partially, electronically. The clause also sought to require the co-operation of employers, and to prevent employers interfering or surveilling the process.

Rights

The EU "Charter of Fundamental Rights" is an attempt to place human rights principles at the core of EU law. So, it's a good thing. Foster voted not to leave it in UK law after Brexit. Why?

Whilst civil liberty advocates have expressed concern that the proposed changes would "erode the right to life, the right to privacy, the right to a fair trial, the right to protest and the right to freedom from torture and discrimination", Foster voted in favour of repealing the Human Rights Act 1998. Why?

Foster voted for mass surveillance and retention of information on people's internet usage.

LGBT Rights

Foster voted against equal rights for gay people, and against same-sex marriage in Northern Ireland.

Foster has almost always voted against laws to promote equality and human rights.

Tax

Foster voted against implementing a series of proposals intended to reduce tax avoidance and evasion.

Foster voted to cut tax credits.

Foster voted to reduce the basic rate of capital gains tax by 8%.

Foster voted to reduce the rate of corporation tax; thereby leaving more money in the hands of business shareholders, and reducing money available for public spending.

Foster voted against requiring multinational enterprises to publish a country-by-country tax strategy including information on their attitude to tax planning.

Foster voted against giving powers to the Financial Conduct Authority and Prudential Regulation Authority to combat abusive tax avoidance arrangements.

Health

Foster voted against allowing a terminally-ill person being allowed assistance to end their life, even if the High Court has given its consent.

Foster has voted against legalising abortion in Northern Ireland and against improving sexual and reproductive health rights and services.

Education

Foster voted to take control of children#s education away from local people and to give it to central government, by turning all primary and secondary schools in England into academies.

Foster voted in favour of replacing student maintenance grants with loans for tuition fees.

Democracy

Foster voted in favour of having fewer MPs but against reducing the number of members of the un-elected House of Lords. He voted against making the House of Lords more democratic by removing hereditary peers. Additionally, her voted against more democracy in the Lords by it becoming wholly elected by the people.

Foster voted against proposals to make the number of MPs from each party in the House of Commons more closely reflect each party's share of the national vote and against a move to fewer constituencies.

For some reason, Foster voted against making it clear that charities can undertake political campaigning.

Foster consistently voted against meaningful devolution to the nations and regions of the UK.

Wales

He has almost always voted against transferring more powers to the Welsh Assembly.

Foster voted against requiring parliament, and the devolved administrations in Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales, as well as a report on the preservation of reciprocal healthcare agreements, before allowing ministers to make regulations to implement the terms of the UK's agreement with the EU on its withdrawal from the union.

On Brexit, Foster voted against allowing the people of Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland to change the EU law that Westminster adopts after exit.

The Welsh Assembly wanted to regulate betting machines that charged over £2. Foster voted to allow the regulation but only for machines that charged over £10.

The Welsh Assembly wanted public bodies to operate train services in Wales but Foster voted against it.

The Welsh Assembly wanted to control the licensing of alcohol and entertainment licenses but Foster voted against it.

The Welsh Assembly wanted to control their own level of Income Tax but Foster voted against it.

The Welsh Assembly wanted the power to set levels of air passenger duty for Welsh airports but Foster voted against it.

Scotland

Foster almost always voted against transferring more powers to the Scottish Parliament.

Foster voted not to require the consent of the Scottish Parliament before various regulations relating taxes on international trade can be made.

Foster voted against requiring the UK Parliament to have the consent of the Scottish Parliament before making laws applying to Scotland on devolved matters.

Foster voted against giving the Scottish Parliament the power to call a referendum on Scottish independence.

Foster voted against giving the Scottish Parliament the power to make laws on child tax credit, and working tax credit.

Foster voted against giving the Scottish Parliament powers related to equalities laws.

Foster voted against allowing the Scottish Parliament to introduce a requirement for gender balance in the Scottish Parliament and Scottish public authorities.

Foster voted against allowing the Scottish Parliament to pay disability benefits in respect of lower level conditions.

Foster voted against allowing the Scottish Parliament to pay a carers benefit to those under 16 or in gainful employment, or in full time education.

Foster voted to require the agreement of central government before Scottish Ministers can change regulations relating to benefit payments in respect of rent.

Foster voted against giving powers related to Housing Benefit in Scotland to the Scottish Parliament.

Foster voted against giving the Scottish Parliament the ability to create new state benefits in Scotland.

Foster voted against giving the Scottish Parliament power over national insurance.

Foster voted against allowing the Scottish Parliament to take full control over taxation, borrowing and public spending in Scotland.

Foster voted against giving the Scottish Parliament a veto on the repeal of the Human Rights Act as it applies to Scotland.

Foster voted against requiring the UK Parliament to have the consent of the Scottish Parliament before legislating on devolved matters.

Foster voted against requiring the consent of the Scottish Parliament and of the Scottish people in a referendum before the Scottish Parliament can be abolished; and against strengthening the constitutional status of the Scottish Parliament.

Local Government

Foster generally voted against more powers for local councils.

Foster voted against making the demolition or change of use of pubs or other drinking establishments subject to planning permission.

Foster voted not to exempt local councils from having to require discounted starter homes on certain new developments.

Foster voted for central government, rather than local councils, to determine how many starter homes to be sold to first time buyers at a discount are to be required in new residential developments.

Foster voted to require local councils to charge high income social housing tenants rent at levels set by central government.

Foster voted in favour of turning all primary and secondary schools in England into academies, shifting control over them from local councils to central government.

Foster always voted for reducing central government funding of local government.

Youth

Foster voted against allowing those aged 16 and 17 to vote in the referendum on the UK's membership of the EU; and against lowering the voting age for local government elections to 16.

Foster voted in favour of replacing student maintenance grants with loans for tuition fees.

Immigration

Foster voted for the Hostile Environment on a number of occasions:

He voted against giving asylum seekers permission to work if a decision on their application takes over six months. Six months. Just for good measure, he voted to restrict the support available to failed asylum seekers.

To add to the hostility, he voted in favour of immigration checks for those opening banks and building society accounts.

Despite the furore over detection centres, Foster voted against banning the immigration detention of pregnant women; and even against guidance to be taken into account on the immigration detention of vulnerable people.

He voted for landlords to perform checks on renters to make it an offence to rent a home to someone who is disqualified as a result of their immigration status.

Foster voted to create criminal offences of renting a home, driving, and working, while disqualified from doing so due to immigration status; and for other measures in the Immigration Bill.

Fire & Police

Foster voted to allow Police and Crime Commissioners (PCC) to be given responsibility for the Fire and Rescue Service. The PPCs are political appointments. They are not independent. After devastating cuts to the police service, we are now seeing the same to the fire service.

Transport

Foster voted against regulation of local bus networks and against those services being in public control. Privatisation that works against the public interest.

He also voted against public ownership of the railways; despite the disgraceful state of Britain's railways.

Also on the railways, Foster voted to build the first and second phases of the HS2 rail network. He voted against a proposal that would allow HS2 passenger services to be run by the public sector operators. On top of that he voted against carrying out an independent peer review of phase two of the project. Why?

Housing

On housing, Foster is very much on the side of private landlords. He voted to phase out secure tenancies for life.

Foster voted to enable central government to require local councils to sell expensive properties (whether they like it or not), and for other proposed changes to the law on housing and planning.

Foster voted to require local councils to charge some social housing tenants rent at levels set by central government.

Landlords often breach the law, charging tenants for services and items that they do not have to pay for. Foster voted against higher fines for those landlords or letting agencies.

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